Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Snow White: A Graphic Novel

Title: Snow White: A Graphic Novel

Series: None

Year: 2016

Author: Matt Phelan

Summary: Award-winning graphic novelist Matt Phelan delivers a darkly stylized noir Snow White set against the backdrop of Depression-era Manhattan.

The scene: New York City, 1928. The dazzling lights cast shadows that grow ever darker as the glitzy prosperity of the Roaring Twenties screeches to a halt. Enter a cast of familiar characters: a young girl, Samantha White, returning after being sent away by her cruel stepmother, the Queen of the Follies, years earlier; her father, the King of Wall Street, who survives the stock market crash only to suffer a strange and sudden death; seven street urchins, brave protectors for a girl as pure as snow; and a mysterious stock ticker that holds the stepmother in its thrall, churning out ticker tape imprinted with the wicked words "Another . . . More Beautiful . . . KILL." In a moody, cinematic new telling of a beloved fairy tale, extraordinary graphic novelist Matt Phelan captures the essence of classic film noir on the page—and draws a striking distinction between good and evil. (from Goodreads)

Main Characters:
~ Samantha "Snow" White
~ The Seven

Review: This was my first-ever graphic novel. I can't say if I much enjoy the genre, to be truthful. It is terribly exciting to see it all sketched out for you, flipping through the pages. However, I felt that because the illustrations were already there, it took away a little bit from my imagination. I was told what to imagine and see, rather than letting my brain fill in what details I wanted.

In some ways, it was extremely interesting. In dealing with certain time eras and elements that I'm not familiar with, it was cool to see exactly what the author meant. I didn't have to guess at what things might look like. It was all right there in front of me. 

But I'll get off my rant about graphic novels. On to the actual story.

Truthfully, it felt a lot like the Disney film version... only set in American 1920s. The time era made certain things feel more realistic, and I haven't read many fairytale retellings set in that time, but I think it all fit very well. The parts with the wicked stepmother were very close to Disney's evil queen. Some of it sometimes felt too close.

I really liked the added details behind Snow's nickname. It made a sweet take on the usual name. And the blood on the snow bit... heart-breaking, but two thumbs up. Sad, I know. No spoilers, sorry, but I liked how he did that.

One thing I really didn't understand and wish the author/designer had done more with was the seven dwarves. In this adaptation, they are seven, ragged Newsie-ish boys (and yes, I kept hearing Carrying the Banner playing in my head everytime they came into the illustrations), used to living rough on the street. They refuse to give Snow their names, which could have led to something really cool, but I felt that that subplot kinda fizzled out there at the end. I would have loved to see a little bit more on that. But I guess you can only include so much in a graphic novel.

Overall, I enjoyed it, but I can't say that it really intrigued me. Maybe it's just the fact that it's a graphic novel, and that's not really my cup of tea. I enjoyed the story, and part of me would love to read this retelling in a full-length novel. If you're into graphic novels and fairytales, then I think this is one you should probably add to your shelf.

Advisory: Some violence. The stepmother orders the huntsman to kill Snow and bring back her heart, so it's the typical retelling violence. 

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

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